Uses and health benefits of krill oil?

What are the uses of krill oil?

You’re unlikely to see krill or krill oil on a restaurant menu near you, although it’s eaten in Japan under the name Okiami. Krill is a small, nondescript crustacean, so what are the uses of krill oil? If researchers are correct, krill provides oil that can assist in everything from osteoarthritis to cholesterol health, as well as supporting your healthy eyes and brain.

Krill’s the catch-all name for 85 or so species and has probably the largest biomass on earth: hundreds of millions of tons. In other words, all the krill in the sea weigh more than any other species.

If you’ve seen the movie Happy Feet Two, the krill are Will and Bill, the shrimp-like critters bickering and biting seals’ butts in their search for enlightenment. Movie buffs will recognise the voices of Matt Damon and Brad Pitt, but in the real world, these invertebrate crustaceans have an important role in the oceans and the ecosystems surrounding them. They form a crucial food for many seabirds (penguins and shearwaters), mammals (whales and seals), reptiles (Turtles) and of course, many kinds of fish (Salmon, squid and sardine).

What is krill oil?

Krill oil is extracted from a kind of krill called Euphrausiasuperba. For many years we’ve extracted Omega 3 from salmon, cod, mackerel and other fish. But it’s been found that krill itself a rich source of Omega 3s.

So why didn’t we simply try krill earlier? One reason may be that there are several kinds of Omega 3s, and the health benefits of each weren’t always clear.

What health benefit does krill oil offer?

Krill oil and fish contain long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of the omega-3 family, EPA and DHA. But here’s the difference: unlike fish oil, the EPA and DHA in krill oil are attached to phospholipids. It’s that difference in composition that impacts absorption. Krill oil also contains a powerful antioxidant called astaxanthin that may prevent EPA and DHA from oxidising.

Krill oil is packed with other important nutrients, including phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA) – shorthand for phosphatidylcholine, or marine lecithin.

Health expert Dr Frank Oz (not to be confused with the celebrity TV doctor with the same surname) writes that krill oil may have 100 times as much Omega 3 as the same dosage of many fish-oil supplements. Overall, it appears to especially benefit the heart and brain, but there’s much more.

It’s good at supporting your heart health by supporting healthy cholesterol levels.

It can also ease joint discomfort support a healthy brain and maintain the functioning of eyes.

Pitfalls of krill oil supplements

So having run through the gambit of its ability to tackle every modern western complaintexcept boy-bands, is there a catch?

It would appear not. Those of us who’re into conscious consumption – knowing where our food comes from – can take heart. The majority of krill that’s caught is used as feed in fish-farms and only around 2% is used in health supplements.

For those of us who endure fishy burps after taking fish-oil capsules, krill oil may be a boon, as it’s easily digested. So there’s no nasty aftertaste in the mouth. Keep in mind though that krill oil is derived from a crustacean, so those with seafood or shellfish allergies should opt for other sources of omega-3.

Krill oil is also claimed to ease the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, depression, ADD and ADHD, as well as treating skin ailments like dermatitis and psoriasis. Astaxanthin, a component of krill oil, protects the skin from damage by ultraviolet rays.

Pitfalls of krill oil supplements

So having run through the gambit of its ability to tackle every modern western ailment except boy-bands, is there a catch?

It would appear not. Those of us who’re into conscious consumption – knowing where our food comes from – can take heart. The majority of krill that’s caught is used as feed in fish-farms and only around 2% is used in health supplements.

For those of us who endure fishy burps after taking fish-oil capsules, krill oil may be a boon, as it’s easily digested. So there’s no nasty aftertaste in the mouth or for the planet. Keep in mind though that krill oil is derived from a crustacean, so those with seafood or shellfish allergies should opt for other sources of omega-3.

Like to know more about Krill Oil? Read Calamari Oil vs Krill Oil: Which One is Right For You?

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2 thoughts on “Uses and health benefits of krill oil?

  1. Pingback: Can Krill Oil Help In Minimizing The Effects Of PMS?

    • H365 Editor

      Yes, research shows that Krill Oil can be more effective than Fish Oil in the management of dysmenorrhea and PMS*. < *Sampalis F, et al. Evaluation of the effects of Neptune Krill Oil on the management of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea. Altern Med Rev 2003;8(2):171-9.>

      Hope this information fulfilled your question.

      Regards,
      Jaime Garces
      Health365 WebTeam Administrator

      Reply

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